Corvus pectoralis Gould, 1836 sec. Droege, G., Corvids of the World

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Corvus pectoralis Gould, 1836 sec. Droege, G., Corvids of the World

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Common Name

English: Collared CrowA

Distribution

Asia-Temperate China (China South-CentralnativeB, China SoutheastnativeA,B, Hainan (HainannativeB)), Asia-Tropical Indo-China (Vietnam (VietnamnativeB,1))
1. N Vietnam

Habitat

SE China: never found far away from water, either salt or fresh.A

Foraging

Various forms of carrions, includes defunct female babies (which are not very uncommon in China) [sic!], fish, and the more easily obtainable forms of marine mollusca.A

Biology And Ecology

Early breeder; callow young found on February 23rd, clutch of eggs almost ready to hatch found on January 26th.C Young birds have been found very early in February, so that at times this Crow lays at the end of December, but the majority of clutches are produced late in February or in March. It is possible that this species is sometimes double-brooded, and it is certain that is possesses a very strong affection for certain nesting-sites.D

Nest

Nearly always placed high up in a tall pine-tree; composed of sticks, some of which are of consideralbe size, with an inner layer of finer twigs and a lining of dry grass and pine-needles.C Small for the size of the bird, is composed externally of sticks or mulberry-canes, on which is laid a layer of mud or clay, and on that again a good thick felt of rags, fur, buffalo-hair, pandanus fibre, pine-needles, and so forth, forming a deep and warm cavity for the reception of the eggs.
The nest is preferably placed in an evergeen tree for its better protection, the COllared Crow being a very early builder, but it has been found in a bamboo amongst those of a colony of Night-Herons, and also in a fir-tree. Up the North River this bird has become a cliff-builder, nesting on ledges of rocks which overhang the stream. When placed in a tree near a Kite's nest, the possessors of the latter persecute the Crows unmercifully, as if they suspected them of egg-stealing.A

Egg

The eggs are very variable in size, shape, and colouring. The ground-colour is light green or bluish green, more or less blotched, spotted, or speckled with sap-green, and there are generally underlying spots of dull reddish grey or violet-grey. The most common shape of the eggs is ovate, but pyriform ovate, elongated ovate, and almost oval eggs also occur. Thirty-nine specimens average 1,67 x 1,19 in, the largest 1,82x1,25, the smallest 1,51x1,17.C The eggs vary in length from 1,95 to 1,50, and in breadth from 1,27 to 1,03, and average 1,66x1,15.D

Behaviour

The sexes pair for life and may be seen going about together in the autumn and winter.
During the winter months this bird selects certain favoured roosting-places, and to these, at the close of the day, large numbersmay be ween winging their way from the feeding-grounds.A

Bibliography

A. Vaughan, R.E. & Jones, K.H., The birds of Hong Kong, Macao, and the West River or Si Kiang in South-East China, with special reference to their nidification and seasonal movements. in The Ibis 10 (1). 1913: 25 [2950]
B. The Howard and Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. 3rd Edition. 2003
C. La Touche, J.D.D. & Rickett, C.B., Further notes on the nesting of birds in the province of Fohkien, S.E. China. in The Ibis 8 (5). 1905: 25 [2948]
D. Vaughan, R.E. & Jones, K.H., The birds of Hong Kong, Macao, and the West River or Si Kiang in South-East China, with special reference to their nidification and seasonal movements. in The Ibis 10 (1). 1913: 26 [2950]