Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler, 1827 sec. Droege, G., Corvids of the World

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Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler, 1827 sec. Droege, G., Corvids of the World

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Editorial Status

Currently not in focus of editorial work, unrevised text, last update: 2016-12-23.

Distribution

Asia-Temperate China (China North-Central (BeijingnativeA, HebeinativeA), China South-CentralnativeA, Hainan (HainannativeA), ManchurianativeA, Qinghai (QinghainativeA), Tibet (TibetnativeA,1)); Eastern Asia (JapannativeA, KoreanativeA, Nansei-shoto (Nansei-shotonativeA), Taiwan (TaiwannativeA)); Russian Far EastnativeA (Kuril Is. (Kuril Is.nativeA,2), Sakhalin (SakhalinnativeA,3)); Western Asia (Afghanistan (AfghanistannativeA)), Asia-Tropical Indian Subcontinent (Assam (AssamnativeA,B), Bangladesh (BangladeshnativeA), East Himalaya (Arunachal PradeshnativeA,B, BhutannativeA,4), India (Andhra PradeshnativeA, BiharnativeA,B, ChandigarhnativeA, HaryananativeA,B, JharkhandnativeA,B, KaraikalnativeA,B, KarnatakanativeB,5, KeralanativeB,6, OrissanativeA,B, PondicherrynativeA,B, PunjabnativeA,B, Tamil NadunativeA,B, Uttar PradeshnativeA,B, West BengalpresentA,B, YanamnativeA), Nepal (NepalnativeA), Pakistan (PakistannativeA,7), Sri Lanka (Sri LankanativeA,B), West HimalayanativeA,B); Indo-China (Andaman Is. (Andaman Is.nativeA), Cambodia (CambodianativeA), Laos (LaosnativeA), Myanmar (MyanmarnativeA,B), Thailand (ThailandnativeA), Vietnam (VietnamnativeA)); Malesia (BorneonativeA, Jawa (JawanativeA), Lesser Sunda Is. (Lesser Sunda Is.nativeA), Malaya (Peninsular MalaysianativeA), Philippines (PhilippinesnativeA), Sulawesi (SulawesinativeA), Sumatera (SumateranativeA))
1. S, SE and E Tibet, 2. S Kuril Is., 3. N Sakhalin, 4. N Bhutan, 5. Mysore hills, 6. Travancore hills, 7. W and N Pakistan

Habitat

Replaces C. splendens as a scavenger at hill-stations all over India. In the Himalaya it is usually found in smaller numbers than C. splendens in the plains. Here, particularly, it moves up and down the heights a great deal according to season - higher in summer (up to 15.000 feet), lower in winter.B

Foraging

Omnivorous; lives on any scraps it can pick up around kitchens and municipal refuse dumps and picnic grounds, or in the vicinity of cooly barracks or outlying shepherds' encampments. While entering a verandah and sidling up to carry off a titbit from the breakfast table, it keeps an ever watchful eye on the exit ready to make a hurried withdrawal on the first scent of supsicion. It is desctructice to fruits in hill orchards and responsible for considerable casualties among the eggs and young of many birds.C

Biology And Ecology

Nest building commences about the end of March or the beginning of April; eggs found on April 25th from a nest in a tall pine.D The normal breeding season in the hills - Himalayas as well as the peninsular and South Indian hills - is chiefly March to May. Both sexes share in the building work, incubation and feeding the young.C

Nest

The nest is of the usual crow type - an untidy platform of twigs lined with soft roots and fibres. It is placed at heights between 20 and 60 feet from the ground in some large tree standing near a village or outlying homestead. In the Himalayas deodars are much favoured.C

Egg

Egg ovate with a very pointed apey. In colour it is light bluish green, blotched and longitudinally streaked with sap-green. There are a few underlying markings of grey. 1,71x1,17 in.D A normal clutch is of 4-6 eggs, pale blue-green, spotted and blotched with brown all over and more densely at the broad end.C

Brood parasite

Ectoparasite

Philopterus lahorensis Ansari, 1955F Philopterus extraneus (Piaget, 1885)G Colpocephalum fregili Denny, 1842H Myrsidea trithorax (Piaget, 1885)I

Bibliography

A. The Howard and Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. 3rd Edition. 2003
B. Ali, S., Indian Hill Birds. 1949: 1 [2945]
C. Ali, S., Indian Hill Birds. 1949: 2 [2945]
D. La Touche, J.D.D. & Rickett, C.B., Further notes on the nesting of birds in the province of Fohkien, S.E. China. in The Ibis 8 (5). 1905: 26 [2948]
E. Makatsch, W., Brood parasitism in birds. [Der Brutparasitismus in der Vogelwelt.]. 1955: 192 [8672]
F. Price & Hellenthal, Taxonomy of Philopterus (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) from the Corvidae (Passeriformes), with descriptions of nine new species. in Annals of the Entomological Society of America 91 (6): 786, 789, 790 [78]
G. Price & Hellenthal, Taxonomy of Philopterus (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) from the Corvidae (Passeriformes), with descriptions of nine new species. in Annals of the Entomological Society of America 91 (6): 786, 793 [78]
H. Ansari, M.A.R., Studies on phthirapteran parasites (Mallophaga) infesting birds in the Panjab in Indian journal of entomology 17. 1956: 399 [8188]
I. Ansari, M.A.R., Studies on phthirapteran parasites (Mallophaga) infesting birds in the Panjab in Indian journal of entomology 17. 1956: 400 [8188]